2017 La Course Route/Profile

Posted by & filed under Climbs, Routes.

The women’s race that accompanies the men’s Tour de France has previously been a circuit race around the classic Champs-Élysées loop in Paris. For 2017 the one-day race has moved to the Alps to tackle a section of the men’s 18th stage (the full length of which doubles up as the 2017 Etape du Tour). Here is the full breakdown of the women’s route.

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Strines – The Final 40km of the Tour de France 2014, Stage 2

Posted by & filed under Climbs, General.

The final 40km of stage 2 of Le Tour is likely to be action packed. The terrain will see to it that attacks will come and the cream of the world’s professional cyclists will emerge at the front to do battle until the finish in Sheffield. The roads here are largely within the Strines region which cyclists from Yorkshire and the Peak District know very well. Many local pros, past and present, have utilised the repeated steep climbs in the area to hone their racing fitness. The Strines Road itself is a notoriously steep stretch of tarmac which begins at the A616 at Midhopestones and terminates at the A57 after 15 rollercoaster kilometres. The Tour riders won’t cover the full length but they will tackle the most severe sections before turning off east towards High Bradfield and further sharp ascents on the approach to Sheffield.

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Le Cote de Jenkin Road

Posted by & filed under Climbs.

Jenkin Road is the final climb on stage 2 of the 2014 Tour de France. Its position on the route, only minutes from finish in Sheffield, is crucial and is likely to influence the final outcome. Jenkin is only short but it is steep enough to be a significant challenge to the riders of Le Tour, especially as it comes after 195 hilly kilometres.

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The Climbs of Stage 2 of the 2014 Tour de France – Part 1

Posted by & filed under Charts, Climbs, Segment Details.

Stage 1 may well have been one for the sprinters but stage 2 is being heralded as a proper, Yorkshire, Northern Classic of a stage, and that means plenty of climbs. The route takes in over 3000m of climbing along its 208km starting in North Yorkshire, passing through West Yorkshire, dipping its toe ever so slightly into Derbyshire before the grand finale in South Yorkshire. There are so many climbs that I’m splitting them up over 2 blog posts! In this post we’ll cover the route from the start at York Racecourse up to the climb of Cragg Vale so make sure you keep an eye out for part 2 next Friday on my Twitter or Facebook pages.

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Holme Moss Climb (Tour de France Stage 2, 2014)

Posted by & filed under Charts, Climbs, Data, Segment Details.

Holme Moss is a bit of a classic around these parts, particularly because it usually requires a fairly long loop and another major climb to get back home again, but also because it is one of the highest roads in the area and at 524m will be the highest point visited by the 2014 Tour de France during its stay in England.

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Buttertubs Pass from Hawes (Tour de France Stage 1, 2014)

Posted by & filed under Charts, Climbs, Data, Segment Details.

The Buttertubs Pass from Hawes in North Yorkshire will be one of the first climbs taken in by the 2014 Tour de France in the heart of the Yorkshire Dales National Park. I’m not going to attempt to regale you with tales of my epic ascent of the climb as I can only remember about 25 metres of it (and I don’t think I’ve ever regaled anything very well) so I’ll stick to what I know and provide the cold, hard stats!

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Train like Wiggins, ditch the power, use the VAM

Posted by & filed under General.

I’m currently multi-tasking my late night baby feeding with reading “My Time” by Bradley Wiggins and was interested to read the following: “The data we had been working on for road racing in 2012 was not power output or speed, but VAM. The average VAM for a big climb on the Tour in 2010 was 1,530-1,600: 1,530 on Plateau de Beille, 1600 on l’Alpe d’Huez.”

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